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Every year I see the same Facebook statuses and tweets around MLK weekend or Atlanta pride. “You can’t afford to go. Why you worried about what they doing with their money?”

This is the only subject I find that we can’t discuss on any social media platform without the girls getting upset. Say one wrong word about anybody going to Atlanta this weekend and they will crucify you.

To be honest some of y’all asses really can’t afford to go but still go and it’s the truth. Some of them can’t afford to go that’s why they’re mad and going in on social media and staying at home. So who’s right? Well if you look at like this. If you had to set up a payment arrangement and have just enough to get there then you should stay your ass at home but you won’t.

Looking at some of the people I’ve seen talk about going could use the money for other things but I honestly don’t care. I’m one of the few who gets no life from being around gays that much. I’ll pooch around for a second but I have to be tipsy. Once the alcohol wears off I realize where I’m at. I’m ready to go. I might be weird but that’s just me.

Can you afford to go is a legitimate question not just for this event but for every other weekend trip as well. Ask yourself if something happens and you have to stay a little longer can you afford to? Do I have any emergency money in case something happens? Will I be able to pay my rent on TIME in 2 weeks? These questions are important if you wanna take the trip or already here.
If you caught a bus here….. Bless. I just don’t want you to get back home Monday imageand trying to figure out how you gone get all your stuff out that apartment in the next 30 days.

 

 

imageIf you’re one of the ones who wait every year to throw shade from your bed cause you don’t have the social skills to bond shut your ass up too. Let these folks do whatever they want. I know me and others are tired of seeing this debate on social media from the same people every year. Shit getting old.

 

 

 

Anyway, let me get back to shading the girls on Twitter about being in the city and sleeping in a hotel room with 5 other queens with 2 beds 38 miles from the festivities. I’ll holla!

 

 

Are you here for MLK Weekend and have enough money to pooch around the city and still pay your bills?

 

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King Of Reads TV

Malik Yoba & The Breakfast Club Interview

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King Of Reads TV

In My Heels | Pose Season 2 Finale | RECAP

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LGBTQ

LGBTQ History Is Now A Part of Illinois Public School Curriculum

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Students that attend public schools in Illinois will learn of the contributions LGBTQ people have made in society. Signed into law on Friday by Governor J.B. Pritzker, the bill is scheduled to go into effect in July 2020.

Introduced as House Bill 246 by Representative Anna Moeller, the bill states the teaching of history will include a study of the roles and contributions of LGBTQ people in the history of this country and Illinois. The bill was heavily supported by Illinois’ largest queer civil rights advocacy group, Equality Illinois. Hoping the curriculum would bolster students’ self-image and make their peers more accepting, the bill received support in both the Senate and House earlier this year.

Illinois Senator Heather Steans said “One of the best ways to overcome intolerance is through education and exposure to different people and viewpoints.” She continued, “An inclusive curriculum will not only teach an accurate version of history, but also promote acceptance of the LGBTQ community.” Steans has been noted as “one of the General Assembly’s most vocal and passionate supporters of full equality for LGBT people.”

The bill details what changes can be expected to history curriculum for the state’s students. According to Equality Illinois, topics that will be added to public schools history curriculum include details like the nation’s first gay rights organization. The bill states all textbooks will include the roles and contributions of those protected b the state’s Human Rights Act, and must be non-discriminatory.

Expressing her hopes that the bill will benefit future generations, Steans said, “LGBTQ children and and teenagers will also be able to gain new role models who share life experiences with them.”

Would you like to see other states enforce similar bills?

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