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Dear Hoteps and Friends, Support Black Art

via Iisaiahb on Twitter
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With the support of black art being celebrated and supported, such as shows like Black Lightning, Grown-ish, and the most recent movie from Marvel, Black Panther on the rise, within the black community, there still lies a large flaw within that realm of support and celebration. Not stating that said art and other already celebrated art does not deserve all the praise they get because they definitely do. But, we must highlight one area of art that is almost always ignored. Our queer artists. With artists like Frank Ocean, Kevin Abstract, Barry Jenkins, Jussie Smollett, Steve Lacy, and many more, much support from the black community is lacking.

These artists do receive such support from those within the black community who do not withhold highly masculine heteronormative ideals for their entertainment consumption and support but, anyone else existing outside those ranks, tend to ignore or complain saying things like, “…they’re forcing a lifestyle,” “…they’re turning our kids gay.” and “…why must we see this gay sh*t on tv.” While the LGBTQ community continues to beg for representation and support while asking, “If this will turn you gay, please explain how there are LGBTQ people despite only seeing heterosexual relationships in every form of media since the dawn of network tv.”

Now, there is a large population of underground black queer artists that are knowingly deserving of a mainstream spotlight. To name a few from the top of one’s head:

Lateef Thynative  a YouTuber from Orlando, Florida now located in Los Angeles, California

Francis Buseko Mubanga  a model from Zambia

Shelton Boyd is a fashion blogger from St. Louis, Missouri

Reece King a model from the United Kingdom

Shabez Jamal a photographer from St. Louis, Missouri

Teacup Dragun a musician from St. Louis, Missouri

Dorian “Scottie” Wilson a nomadic photographer from New York City

Durand Bernarr an amazing musician from Los Angeles, California

Ze Taylor a rapper musician from Atlanta, Georgia

Jade Foxy Hot Mess a comedian YouTuber currently living in Los Angeles, California

Kat Blaque a writer, YouTuber, illustrator, animator, and activist from Laguna Hills, California

Crissle a podcaster and media personality from Oklahoma now living in New York

Briyonce Bundick-Kelly a dancer and comedian from Alaska

And that is to just name a few. Honestly, if one was to name all of the queer artists deserving of a spotlight, you would be reading for months. But, then again, mainstream media alongside homophobic consumers refuse to grant those their deserved spotlight.

With all of the influence the LGBTQ+ community has had on mainstream media, those creatives are stolen from and ignored on a regular basis with the loose usage of their slang such as “slay”, “shade”, “yass”, “serving”, “fish”, “cock”, and many more, but I digress.

These black bigots have a plethora of excuses for not supporting black queer art. And with all of those excuses, it would take several eons to debunk all of the homophobic beliefs they have. So, as the token black gay in most “pro-black” spaces, one shall leave only one message:

Dear Hoteps and Friends,

Black queer art is black art. To be pro-black is to also, be pro-black queerness. To support black art and black businesses is to also support black queer art and black queer businesses. It is clear that you long to exclude black queer people from the black community and one is here to inform you that, that, is what you call “anti-blackness” or more commonly known as “coonery”. All that is asked of you, is that you support ALL black art, just as those black artists have, and do support you.

With much love and well wishes,
A Black Queer Artist

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King Of Reads TV

In My Heels | Pose Season 2 Finale | RECAP

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LGBTQ

LGBTQ History Is Now A Part of Illinois Public School Curriculum

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Students that attend public schools in Illinois will learn of the contributions LGBTQ people have made in society. Signed into law on Friday by Governor J.B. Pritzker, the bill is scheduled to go into effect in July 2020.

Introduced as House Bill 246 by Representative Anna Moeller, the bill states the teaching of history will include a study of the roles and contributions of LGBTQ people in the history of this country and Illinois. The bill was heavily supported by Illinois’ largest queer civil rights advocacy group, Equality Illinois. Hoping the curriculum would bolster students’ self-image and make their peers more accepting, the bill received support in both the Senate and House earlier this year.

Illinois Senator Heather Steans said “One of the best ways to overcome intolerance is through education and exposure to different people and viewpoints.” She continued, “An inclusive curriculum will not only teach an accurate version of history, but also promote acceptance of the LGBTQ community.” Steans has been noted as “one of the General Assembly’s most vocal and passionate supporters of full equality for LGBT people.”

The bill details what changes can be expected to history curriculum for the state’s students. According to Equality Illinois, topics that will be added to public schools history curriculum include details like the nation’s first gay rights organization. The bill states all textbooks will include the roles and contributions of those protected b the state’s Human Rights Act, and must be non-discriminatory.

Expressing her hopes that the bill will benefit future generations, Steans said, “LGBTQ children and and teenagers will also be able to gain new role models who share life experiences with them.”

Would you like to see other states enforce similar bills?

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For The Culture

We Support Black Queer Youth. Including Zion Wade.

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Gabrielle Union Dwyane Wade Zion Wade

Dwyane Wade and Gabrielle Union supported their son, Zion Wade, at Miami Pride and there’s something I need our community to understand — Until you value ALL Black lives, you don’t believe Black lives matter.

Growing up as the daughter of a Black man who stated he would disown me for my queerness, I celebrate the love and support Dwyane and Gabrielle shower Zion with. It’s one of the most beautiful things I have ever seen and something that should be afforded to everyone within the LGBTQIA+ community indiscriminately. However, several troglodytic, backwards people believe that rather than protection, Zion deserves correction.

At 11-years-old, Zion Wade has expressed ownership of his identity. I applaud him. When I was 11, I was a victim of the same ridiculous banter all children hear. “Look at you and [random heterosexual boy], y’all are so cute together. I can’t wait until y’all grow up!” The same people who push children into heterosexual relationships without question are currently asking “How old is Zion? Isn’t he too young for this? How does he even know he’s gay?” as if queerness ebbs and flows like the tide. As if his identity comes later in life like a Pokemon evolution. The level of homophobia in the Black community during a time when we are losing more children to suicide because of their queerness and our community’s refusal to accept them is baffling.

It is difficult enough in this country to survive as a Black person without the added stress of being shunned by your own community. So many queer people find themselves without unconditional love, which results in them fleeing hostile living conditions and facing homelessness. And we have the audacity to wonder why children like Jamel Myles die by suicide at the age of 9.

If you are unable or unwilling to show up for queer Black youth, you’re just going to have to square up in 2019.

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