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Dear Hoteps and Friends, Support Black Art

via Iisaiahb on Twitter
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With the support of black art being celebrated and supported, such as shows like Black Lightning, Grown-ish, and the most recent movie from Marvel, Black Panther on the rise, within the black community, there still lies a large flaw within that realm of support and celebration. Not stating that said art and other already celebrated art does not deserve all the praise they get because they definitely do. But, we must highlight one area of art that is almost always ignored. Our queer artists. With artists like Frank Ocean, Kevin Abstract, Barry Jenkins, Jussie Smollett, Steve Lacy, and many more, much support from the black community is lacking.

These artists do receive such support from those within the black community who do not withhold highly masculine heteronormative ideals for their entertainment consumption and support but, anyone else existing outside those ranks, tend to ignore or complain saying things like, “…they’re forcing a lifestyle,” “…they’re turning our kids gay.” and “…why must we see this gay sh*t on tv.” While the LGBTQ community continues to beg for representation and support while asking, “If this will turn you gay, please explain how there are LGBTQ people despite only seeing heterosexual relationships in every form of media since the dawn of network tv.”

Now, there is a large population of underground black queer artists that are knowingly deserving of a mainstream spotlight. To name a few from the top of one’s head:

Lateef Thynative  a YouTuber from Orlando, Florida now located in Los Angeles, California

Francis Buseko Mubanga  a model from Zambia

Shelton Boyd is a fashion blogger from St. Louis, Missouri

Reece King a model from the United Kingdom

Shabez Jamal a photographer from St. Louis, Missouri

Teacup Dragun a musician from St. Louis, Missouri

Dorian “Scottie” Wilson a nomadic photographer from New York City

Durand Bernarr an amazing musician from Los Angeles, California

Ze Taylor a rapper musician from Atlanta, Georgia

Jade Foxy Hot Mess a comedian YouTuber currently living in Los Angeles, California

Kat Blaque a writer, YouTuber, illustrator, animator, and activist from Laguna Hills, California

Crissle a podcaster and media personality from Oklahoma now living in New York

Briyonce Bundick-Kelly a dancer and comedian from Alaska

And that is to just name a few. Honestly, if one was to name all of the queer artists deserving of a spotlight, you would be reading for months. But, then again, mainstream media alongside homophobic consumers refuse to grant those their deserved spotlight.

With all of the influence the LGBTQ+ community has had on mainstream media, those creatives are stolen from and ignored on a regular basis with the loose usage of their slang such as “slay”, “shade”, “yass”, “serving”, “fish”, “cock”, and many more, but I digress.

These black bigots have a plethora of excuses for not supporting black queer art. And with all of those excuses, it would take several eons to debunk all of the homophobic beliefs they have. So, as the token black gay in most “pro-black” spaces, one shall leave only one message:

Dear Hoteps and Friends,

Black queer art is black art. To be pro-black is to also, be pro-black queerness. To support black art and black businesses is to also support black queer art and black queer businesses. It is clear that you long to exclude black queer people from the black community and one is here to inform you that, that, is what you call “anti-blackness” or more commonly known as “coonery”. All that is asked of you, is that you support ALL black art, just as those black artists have, and do support you.

With much love and well wishes,
A Black Queer Artist

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For The Culture

We Support Black Queer Youth. Including Zion Wade.

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Gabrielle Union Dwyane Wade Zion Wade

Dwyane Wade and Gabrielle Union supported their son, Zion Wade, at Miami Pride and there’s something I need our community to understand — Until you value ALL Black lives, you don’t believe Black lives matter.

Growing up as the daughter of a Black man who stated he would disown me for my queerness, I celebrate the love and support Dwyane and Gabrielle shower Zion with. It’s one of the most beautiful things I have ever seen and something that should be afforded to everyone within the LGBTQIA+ community indiscriminately. However, several troglodytic, backwards people believe that rather than protection, Zion deserves correction.

At 11-years-old, Zion Wade has expressed ownership of his identity. I applaud him. When I was 11, I was a victim of the same ridiculous banter all children hear. “Look at you and [random heterosexual boy], y’all are so cute together. I can’t wait until y’all grow up!” The same people who push children into heterosexual relationships without question are currently asking “How old is Zion? Isn’t he too young for this? How does he even know he’s gay?” as if queerness ebbs and flows like the tide. As if his identity comes later in life like a Pokemon evolution. The level of homophobia in the Black community during a time when we are losing more children to suicide because of their queerness and our community’s refusal to accept them is baffling.

It is difficult enough in this country to survive as a Black person without the added stress of being shunned by your own community. So many queer people find themselves without unconditional love, which results in them fleeing hostile living conditions and facing homelessness. And we have the audacity to wonder why children like Jamel Myles die by suicide at the age of 9.

If you are unable or unwilling to show up for queer Black youth, you’re just going to have to square up in 2019.

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Perez Hilton Faces Harsh Criticism For Outing Son of Brunei Sultan

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Perez Hilton Brunei

Following the news that the Nation of Brunei would be enacting a Sharia law policy, celebrities and LGBT advocates spoke out against the injustice. Stating that the punishment for homosexuality and adultery is death by stoning, the law prompted a boycott of nine hotels owned by the Sultan in a viral campaign. For Perez Hilton, the boycott simply wasn’t enough. In a tasteless, insensitive, and life-threatening action, the gossip blogger outed the Sultan’s son.

In a recent YouTube video, Perez Hilton alleged that the Prince Azim, who is fourth in the line of succession, is gay. Although Perez understands that the law is “tantamount to LGBT genocide,” he fails to see that his decision to out the young prince is equally dangerous. Stating “It’s so hypocritical. This guy’s son is a big flamer, and now he’s enacted a law to stone to death gay men,” Perez believed that outing Prince Azim was for “the greater good.” However, the blogger has been on the defensive as few agree with his approach.

Advocates and members of the LGBT+ community assert Perez has placed the 36-year-old royal in the line of fire for a potential honor killing. According to Matthew Woolfe, a human rights group founder, the Sultan has been working diligently in an effort to clean up the family’s reputation. Known for a lifestyle of excess and filled with several controversies this sudden adoption of Sharia Penal Code is purportedly due to his desire to create a more palatable legacy. Perez’s recent admission poses a significant threat to Sultan Hassanal Bolkiah’s legacy, his outed son Azim, and even Perez himself.

In Harm’s Way

Before his unverified admission, Perez said the following:

“Y’all know I don’t out people anymore. I used to do that back in the day, but I’m making an exception here. I’m guessing the Sultan of Brunei doesn’t know that his son, Prince Azim, is a big old homo. I would know because I have spent time with him.”

Although Perez insists that neither he nor the Sultan’s son are in harm’s way because the law requires four Muslim witnesses, Brunei locals tell a different story. According to Shahiran S Shahrani who spoke with BBC News, queer citizens are living in fear.

“The gay community in Brunei has never been open but when Grindr came that helped people meet in secret. But now, what I’ve heard is that hardly anyone is using Grindr anymore. They’re afraid that they might talk to a police officer pretending to be gay. It hasn’t happened yet, but because of the new laws, people are afraid.”

As far as whether or not Perez is feeling remorse, outing queer people in violent environments is the hill he has chosen to die on.

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Dating With HIV

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