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BREAKING: Homosexual Hate Group Poised to Attack

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Rumors of a recent meeting organized by QUEEN, a coalition of homosexual extremists, began swirling this morning after an alleged meeting agenda surfaced online. The document, dated Friday, January 12th, appears to outline strategies to infiltrate various sectors in an attempt to contaminate some individuals with venomous homosexuality.

The target remains to be, of course, heterosexual men.

While every talking point on the gay agenda are all a cause for concern, the public has been especially alarmed about “The Antidote” under item C. Toxicology experts theorize that this is a newly-engineered poison created by highly-skilled biochemists to turn men gay. The gay gene, a preceding topic of discussion, has been a long time indicator of homosexuality in early adolescence in males.

In the 1970s, two investigative journalists uncovered documents detailing the now-confirmed existence of “coercion camps”. Men between the ages of 18 and 35 have been deluded under false pretenses to attend, all having been told that extended invitations were only for elite members of society and to keep all details confidential. All men were automatically enrolled in college-level courses, much like the ones listed under agenda item E… Read more at FonzFranc.com

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Drag Is Not Exempt From The Isms, In Fact, It Is Entrenched in Them

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Online bullying and harassment is real. Many of the drag race queens have had to endure heinous comments and vicious attacks by folks who call themselves fans. I’ve heard several horror stories, as some queens have shared accounts of their own online experiences.

I think it was Morgan McMichaels who was told to kill herself by an angry (and irrational) fan of BenDeLaCreme in response to a disagreement the two talented queens had on drag race. Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, and all the other social media platforms are often unkind and disturbing spaces.

DeLa holding up her own lipstick- eliminating herself from the competition.

The further you are on the margins, the more harassment and violence you are susceptible to. I struggle to imagine the experiences of Black trans disabled poor undocumented women on any of the aforementioned platforms, let alone in their lives outside the computer screen and the latest iPhone.

Again, online harassment is real- it takes the form of disgusting words and images, erasure, racism, misogyny, misogynoir, queer and trans antagonism, ableism, and all the other isms. It is sickening (not in the drag way), and a reflection of the times we live in.

As we continue to have critical conversations, it is important that we don’t conflate online harassment with the calling out of white supremacist cisheteropatriarchy which drag race is entrenched in. I feel confident that many queens are intentionally confusing the two to evade accountability, and labeling liberation seekers as attackers.

Drag queens Milk and Trixie posing for the camera.

When a socially conscious fan says, “I think Trixie’s proximity to whiteness was a significant reason she won All Stars 3,” that’s not an act of bullying to Trixie- that is a critique of the violent system we live in.

When a fan says, “Milk’s disrespect of Kennedy Davenport and her drag felt much like anti-Blackness,” again, that’s not an attack on Milk- this is an attempt to hold Milk accountable for their actions, and hopefully spur a conversation that prepares us all to interrogate the ways in which anti-Blackness shows up in our lives.

We live in a system that privileges some folks, and deeply marginalizes others. Drag is not exempt from this system or this conversation; actually, RuPaul has placed drag smack dab in the heart of pop culture. Although we are all queer, that doesn’t mean violence doesn’t exist intracommunity- in particular to Black and brown trans and gender non-conforming folks.

Moreover, when a queen labels social critique as an attack, they themselves are committing violence. They are gaslighting the folks who have a legitimate concern with how the people on the margins of the margins are experiencing a system meant to extinguish their fire. Additionally, we throw away an opportunity to have a meaningful conversation on liberation and accountability.

Although difficult, it’s time for us to be honest. If we’re going to engage these critical conversations, let’s center truth(s). I am observing a lot of conversation on online harassment, and rightfully so. However, I’ve not heard any queen talk about how this toxic system infiltrates drag culture.

There is a reason why. Let’s talk.


Cody Charles is the author of Mudbound: Uncovering The Parts Of Ourselves We Sacrifice In Order To SurviveA Dream Undeterred: 10 Dreams I Want To Live Out In My Black Fat Queer Body In 2018Our Favorite Blackity Black Quotes In Black CinemaEngaging My Black Fat Body, Re-Imagining Black LoveYou Can’t Outdo Black PeopleBlack Joy, We Deserve ItThe Night The Moonlight Caught My Eye: Not a Review but a Testimony on the Film Moonlight5 Tips For White Folks, As They Engage Jordan Peele’s Get Out. (No Spoilers), and What Growing Up Black And Poor Taught Me About Resiliency. Join him for more conversation on Twitter (@_codykeith_) and Facebook (Follow Cody Charles). Please visit his blog, Reclaiming Anger, to learn more about him.

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The Library Is Open: A Few Final Reads On RPDR All Stars 3

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Already in shock that Shangela was barricaded from the top two, I was preparing myself for a Kennedy Davenport win. Kennedy utterly slayed the final lip-sync to an unimpressive song that mostly favored the other queen. Kennedy performed better than her competitor throughout the season, which was not hard seeing that the other half of the top two did not win a single challenge. Because I like to be naive at times, as it can be cute and endearing, I hoped Kennedy would be the choice. However, my ancestors and the spirits who hold my past traumas spoke to me and said, “Sis, you know better than that- we’ve already prepared you for this moment.” So, as RuPaul announced the country queen as the winner, this complicated feeling swept over me. It was a mixture between surprise and this intense calm.

via GIPHY

Because I at times commit to poor decisions, I decided to watch the finale at a local bar- one that is queer friendly. Well, white queer friendly. The crowning was accompanied by the whitest and loudest applause I’ve heard in a bar setting- applause and noise that rivaled any sporting event I’ve ever watched in a public space. This reminds me that I am never safe in this Black fat body, no matter if the setting is queer and well-intentioned.

Yes, I know RPDR is riddled with every ism and phobia, but still I thought better of these people. Click To Tweet

I feel guilty for being angry, because I know this show remains problematic in many ways. However, I am legit sadden by this expected surprise. Yes, I know this show is riddled with every ism and phobia, but still I thought better of these people. And of course someone will soon hop on my timeline telling me that I shouldn’t care so much- and honestly I will probably cuss them the phuck out. I would hope I’d respond differently, but I know my brand. Smh.

This season, this episode, triggered some bad memories and emotions for me. Once again, it told me that I will never be enough in this fat, Black, queer body. Whiteness and white mediocrity will often be the victor, will often be praised, and will do their best to gaslight you when it’s all said and done.

Cast of Paris is Burning

Here are a few insights I must get off my heart. In the tradition of Paris is Burning, I honor the Black and brown queens who made drag what it is today…

The library is open, hunty.

Kennedy Davenport doesn’t deserve your pity. She deserves no one’s pity because she is a boss. She is a champion with or without the crown. She deserved to be in the Top four, and deserved to beat that other gurl in the final two. Not a read, just true.

Shangela was the clear winner. CLEARLY. And her face showed me that she knew she was morally better than most queens in that room, in that moment. Halleloo.

RuPaul once said that drag pokes fun at the rules (a loose interpretation of something he actually said), but in practice has successfully helped white cis-heteropatriarchy thrive in drag. RuPaul is committed to uplifting whiteness, as it is attached to capitalism. Sis wants another Emmy and a much larger check- the internalized anti-Blackness has runneth over, all over those pretty suits and pretty gowns. RuPaul must have sincerely been flattered by the winner’s impersonation of him in the Snatch Game.
…And he is a legend and a trailblazer.

Beware of white people who think this chick with the ethnic puff on the top of her head deserved to win. They are the same people who whisper #AllLivesMatter to one another in Black and brown spaces. They are the same people who love having Black friends, but are absent when violent shyt goes down. They are the same people who are hypercritical of Black queens, but then show up to their shows and events to steal dance moves and drag techniques. They are the Toros of life, a la the white cheerleaders in Bring it On.

The white queen whose name rhymes with silk, and makes me proud to be lactose intolerant is…spolied.

Bebe Zahara Benet is me if I ever do drag. Muva is unshakable. It was clear that she didn’t define her worth by what these other queens thought. She doesn’t have to be crowned the queen because she already knows she is one.

The white queen who dons dreadlocks showed her anti-Black and classist ass in her original season by how she treated both Bob The Drag Queen and Chi Chi DeVayne. <sigh> Some things never change. However, she was the only queen who voted for Shangela to be in the top two.

I was waiting for Aja to conjure Crystal LaBeija once Ru announced the top two. However, Aja chose the Milwaukee queen over Shangela to be in the top two, so perhaps LaBeija was out to lunch with Monique.

I’m noticing on social media that a lot of the Black and brown queens are on this condragulations tour- celebrating a queen that had no business winning, and avoiding any of the racialized critiques. To them, I say be careful. Click To Tweet

I’m noticing on social media that a lot of the Black and brown queens are on this condragulations tour- celebrating a queen that had no business winning, and avoiding any of the racialized critiques. To them, I say be careful. There are young Black and brown queens who are looking up to you, and learning how to address racism and anti-Blackness in this industry by carefully observing your every move. However, I understand that your speaking up puts your booking fee at risk, your livelihood at risk. This is how white supremacy traps Black and brown bodies.

White queens who talk about white supremacy, misogyny, and queer and transantagonism on their platforms, I await your voice in this conversation. It is your responsibility to challenge your fellow white queens, and your problematic followers. Get to it.

I also want to be clear. I believe the winner of the third cycle of All Stars identifies as biracial/multiracial with roots to the Ojibwe people, and that matters in their journey to the crown. And, in this industry, this human still benefits from white privilege in some truly complex ways. Trixie, you have a responsibility in this conversation as well.

The Library is closed, officially.

via GIPHY

In closing.

All (Monique) heart, we love you, Shangela. We love you, Bebe. And we love you, Kennedy. Please continue to shine for usHere is my love letter to you all.

 


Cody Charles is the author of Mudbound: Uncovering The Parts Of Ourselves We Sacrifice In Order To SurviveA Dream Undeterred: 10 Dreams I Want To Live Out In My Black Fat Queer Body In 2018Our Favorite Blackity Black Quotes In Black CinemaEngaging My Black Fat Body, Re-Imagining Black LoveYou Can’t Outdo Black PeopleBlack Joy, We Deserve ItThe Night The Moonlight Caught My Eye: Not a Review but a Testimony on the Film Moonlight5 Tips For White Folks, As They Engage Jordan Peele’s Get Out. (No Spoilers), and What Growing Up Black And Poor Taught Me About Resiliency. Join him for more conversation on Twitter (@_codykeith_) and Facebook (Follow Cody Charles). Please visit his blog, Reclaiming Anger, to learn more about him.

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LGBTQ

Dear Hoteps and Friends, Support Black Art

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via Iisaiahb on Twitter

With the support of black art being celebrated and supported, such as shows like Black Lightning, Grown-ish, and the most recent movie from Marvel, Black Panther on the rise, within the black community, there still lies a large flaw within that realm of support and celebration. Not stating that said art and other already celebrated art does not deserve all the praise they get because they definitely do. But, we must highlight one area of art that is almost always ignored. Our queer artists. With artists like Frank Ocean, Kevin Abstract, Barry Jenkins, Jussie Smollett, Steve Lacy, and many more, much support from the black community is lacking.

These artists do receive such support from those within the black community who do not withhold highly masculine heteronormative ideals for their entertainment consumption and support but, anyone else existing outside those ranks, tend to ignore or complain saying things like, “…they’re forcing a lifestyle,” “…they’re turning our kids gay.” and “…why must we see this gay sh*t on tv.” While the LGBTQ community continues to beg for representation and support while asking, “If this will turn you gay, please explain how there are LGBTQ people despite only seeing heterosexual relationships in every form of media since the dawn of network tv.”

Now, there is a large population of underground black queer artists that are knowingly deserving of a mainstream spotlight. To name a few from the top of one’s head:

Lateef Thynative  a YouTuber from Orlando, Florida now located in Los Angeles, California

Francis Buseko Mubanga  a model from Zambia

Shelton Boyd is a fashion blogger from St. Louis, Missouri

Reece King a model from the United Kingdom

Shabez Jamal a photographer from St. Louis, Missouri

Teacup Dragun a musician from St. Louis, Missouri

Dorian “Scottie” Wilson a nomadic photographer from New York City

Durand Bernarr an amazing musician from Los Angeles, California

Ze Taylor a rapper musician from Atlanta, Georgia

Jade Foxy Hot Mess a comedian YouTuber currently living in Los Angeles, California

Kat Blaque a writer, YouTuber, illustrator, animator, and activist from Laguna Hills, California

Crissle a podcaster and media personality from Oklahoma now living in New York

Briyonce Bundick-Kelly a dancer and comedian from Alaska

And that is to just name a few. Honestly, if one was to name all of the queer artists deserving of a spotlight, you would be reading for months. But, then again, mainstream media alongside homophobic consumers refuse to grant those their deserved spotlight.

With all of the influence the LGBTQ+ community has had on mainstream media, those creatives are stolen from and ignored on a regular basis with the loose usage of their slang such as “slay”, “shade”, “yass”, “serving”, “fish”, “cock”, and many more, but I digress.

These black bigots have a plethora of excuses for not supporting black queer art. And with all of those excuses, it would take several eons to debunk all of the homophobic beliefs they have. So, as the token black gay in most “pro-black” spaces, one shall leave only one message:

Dear Hoteps and Friends,

Black queer art is black art. To be pro-black is to also, be pro-black queerness. To support black art and black businesses is to also support black queer art and black queer businesses. It is clear that you long to exclude black queer people from the black community and one is here to inform you that, that, is what you call “anti-blackness” or more commonly known as “coonery”. All that is asked of you, is that you support ALL black art, just as those black artists have, and do support you.

With much love and well wishes,
A Black Queer Artist

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