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The views and opinions expressed in this article solely belong, to FonzFranc
 
This post may ruffle the feathers of some, probably most, if not all...
but that is perfectly fine with me.

 

Bigots love hiding behind their beloved first amendment, but what some folks fail to understand is that sometimes free speech comes with a price. While all of us are guilty of making harsh and hateful statements (and I challenge you to find me someone, dead or alive, who is not Jesus, that isn’t), it takes an especially disgusting human being to do this consciously and continuously. I’m writing this post strictly within the context of race and race alone, and might I also remind those of you reading that this is simply my perspective. I was inspired by watching the latest season of MTV’s “The Real World” because this season, we’re introduced to two women who come from different walks of life that can’t seem to connect in ideal ways whatsoever. Hey, MTV knew what they were getting into picking strangers to live together. The goal was always to “find out what happens when people stop being polite and start getting real“. Well, in the latest episode, shit got real.

Bigots love hiding behind their beloved first amendment…

 

The following statement is not meant to imply whatsoever that black people are irrational and unruly, however, MTV cast one of the most patient, deserving and understanding black women I’ve seen on reality TV in a while. Take Ceejai Jenkins. Considering her tragic story, which includes the fatal shooting of her mother by her own father, after which he takes his own life, Ceejai does not seem to be a woman held down by her battles. Her “cool” factor remained unscathed through the duration of her stay regardless of her cast mate Jenna’s nasty, racist comments.

No amount of editing could have washed out or added to the unfiltered frustration Ceejai felt, which is why I say with no regrets that I am very glad she laid hands on Jenna. IF you disagree with me, that’s your business. My opinion on this matter remains unchanged. Especially with supporting footage of Jenna’s blissfully ignorant commentary. It’s unfortunate that I’m rejoicing in someone getting their ass whooped, but just as it is a harsh reality for me that racists like Jenna exist and are a dime a dozen, it should be a reality for racists like Jenna that there are those out there who will make them eat their nasty words. “The Real World” is entertainment, yes, but it’s quite often overlooked as a social experiment. That being said, let’s ask some questions and try to answer them too.

 

    1. What does this particular ‘Real World’ moment say about racism in society today? It exists, unfortunately, but it doesn’t always prevail. Despite afterward feeling like she let someone get the best of her, Ceejai came onto this show with a ton of personal baggage. There are those who acknowledge the privilege they have and would abuse it. Jenna seems to be one of those people who grew up not having anyone around her to properly school her on racism and prejudice, and I’d bet that it’s because everyone around her was also racist and held tons of prejudice.

 

    1. What is the proper way to deal with a situation just like, or similar to, this? The ideal way would be to show patience. It isn’t good to give someone the power of knowing what triggers you. That knowledge in the wrong hands could be used against you. Educate. Sometimes a person’s skewed views on society come from a lack of knowledge, maybe even a serious unwillingness to learn and do better. If that doesn’t work, and if you somehow still are cornered, pressured and tormented, give just enough of an ass whooping to remind them that they had plenty of chances to get their act together-and that you simply aren’t one to fuck with. If you want to see these tips in practice, refer to the video above.

 

  1. What is one lesson to be learned from watching drama like this unfold right before our eyes? First, understand that this isn’t the first time blatant racism has been documented on national television. Second, that’s a problem in and of itself. A lesson to be learned here is that ignorance is a thick stain that sometimes cannot be scrubbed out. People take advantage of your soft spots, and sometimes, in the wrong conditions, we’re forced to react. That’s reality. We talk so much about what we want society to be like, but until that happens, we have to navigate through our problems the best way we know how. 

If you didn’t already catch my drift, I don’t blame Ceejai at all. In fact, I’ll admit I get satisfaction watching her handle Jenna. I want people to know that pressure points are real. Black people, we can be as patient, docile, and peaceful as they want us to be. I’ve been exposed to racism at various levels in my lifetime, and I’ll be the first to say that patience doesn’t always work. But by any means, we must get respect if we’re expected to give it. This goes for anyone. I’m a firm believer in treating others the way you’d want to be treated, but I’m also a firm believer in getting exactly what you asked for. Again, this isn’t the first time racism has reared its ugly head on national television, but I’m sure glad conversations are being sparked. And if you’re deeply offended by my take on this altercation, I want you to know that from the bottom of my heart, I could give a shit less.
And to all the Jennas of the world who saw this season of “The Real World”, know that freedom of speech is cool and all, but words hold weight. Apply thought next time and spread knowledge to your fellow Jennas about the existing consequences of being racist like we know the existing consequences of being people of color. Hopefully, this won’t be you.

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2 Comments

  1. Melissa

    May 30, 2016 at 3:13 pm

    Although I agree to your opinion to a certain extent at the end of the day her putting her hands on the girl is only going to hurt her. She is trying to become a lawyer and something like this is only going to make it that much harder for her to do so and to be hired, only because it is recorded on film, God forbid this girl presses charges on her, her whole career could be ruined over 30 seconds on video. We have to be careful and mindful of our situations in life before we decide to react especially violently. I secretly feel like the girl deserved it but now Ceejay may be the one to pay the ultimate price unfortunately. Yes sometimes we do feel the need to “make” people respect us, but we have to recognize when it’s going to be counterproductive.

  2. Katelyn

    September 13, 2016 at 7:26 pm

    I don’t agree with Jenna’s views but it is never okay to resort to physical violence. Especially when the victim is in a position (physically) where they can’t defend themselves, that is a coward’s attack. I think its clear that Jenna had struggles of her own that made her the way she was. Again, not an excuse but it makes her more understandable.

    Ceejai, and Chris, have clearly dealt with oppression for simply being who they are for their entire lives and now they are forced to live in a home with someone who is essentially the image of their oppressors. I think she wound up taking the brunt of a lifetime of frustrations for statements that were wrong but absolutely did not justify what happened to her.

    We cannot control other people, we can only control our reaction to them and Ceejai lowered herself substantially when she quite brutally attacked her. Not to mention it makes her a hypocrite when she touts her anti-violence agenda. Jenna may have pushed her first in another altercation but she certainly didn’t hurt her, I wasn’t shocked and disgusted when she got shoved, but I was actually disturbed watching Jenna be attacked the way she was.

    The roommates also tried to change her by berating and isolating her, not exactly the best way to teach someone another way of thinking. It doesn’t matter if there is a right or a wrong in this particular situation because as long as violence is the end result no progress will ever be made.

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