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Rest In Peace Dr. Olivia J. Hooker: A Survivor of The Tulsa Race Riots

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Dr. Olivia J. Hooker was an African American psychologist and one of few remaining survivors of one of America’s darkest racial atrocities, The Tulsa Race Riot also known as the Tulsa Massacre. She recently died this Wednesday before Thanksgiving. She lived to the age of 103 and has achieved a lot accomplishments during her long life.

Tweet Provided by Admiral Karl Schultz

 Accomplishments

Dr. Hooker was the first black woman to join the United States Coast Guard in 1945 after being rejected from the Navy twice. She served until 1946 after World War II had ended.

She obtained her masters and doctorates degree in psychology. Eventually she became a professor of psychology at Fordham University where she had a focus on people with developmental and intellectual disabilities. Oh! Not to mention she’s a founder of the American Psychological Division 33.

In 2015 President Barack Obama recognized her in his commencement address at the Coast Guard Academy in New London, Conn. In his address he says, “a passionate advocate for Americans with disabilities, a psychologist counseling young children, a caregiver at the height of the AIDS epidemic, a tireless voice for justice and equality.” 

The Coast Guard also named a building after her on Staten Island in 2015. Not to mention she’s also an advocate for civil rights.

Tulsa Race Riot & Death of Black Wall Street

Dr. Hooker remembers the racially fueled attack on the Greenwood neighborhood from mobs of white people who were upset over an allegation of a young black man assaulting a white woman in the elevator. 

Dubbed the Black Wall Street Greenwood was a neighborhood where blacks had enough money to be able to support each other during the time where Oklahoma state laws segregated them from being unable to go anywhere else to get their goods and services they needed.

In 1921 after Dick Rowland was accused of assaulting a white woman a white mob assembled outside of the courthouse ready to lynch him. However a group of World War I veterans countered them and shots were fired. After this it was a wrap. The tyrannical mob was ready to burn down Greenwood to the group.

When the mobs arrived at Dr. Hooker’s house her mother hid her and her siblings under the dining room table with a tablecloth and instructed them to not make a sound no matter what. The mob broke into their house and destroyed her sister’s piano and her fathers record player amongst some of their possessions. 

The attack on Greenwood  lasted for over 18 hours and resulted in 10,000 black people becoming homeless. Approximately 1000 homes and businesses were destroyed and between 36 to 85 people were killed during this domestic terrorist attack. 

Aftermath

The devastation caused by the mob attacks caused many families including Dr. Hooker’s to move and restart their lives over again. Others chose to stays and start rebuilding their lives over.

Dr. Hooker’s family moved to Topeka Kansas and eventually settled in Ohio. Her father went on a tour on the east coast to gain support to help others back in Tulsa rebuild their lives after the attack on Greenwood.

The attack on Dr. Hooker didn’t stop her from achieving greatness. She was able to be recognized by many and in her death her legacy will live on in the history books.

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Dear Steve Harvey

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For The Culture

21 Savage to be Released from ICE Custody on Bond

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Rolling Stone

Thanks to pressure applied by grassroots community organizers and lawyers connected to the #Free21Savage movement, the rapper has been released on bond.

Following news that ShaYaa Bin Abraham-Joseph was detained by ICE and subjected to 23 hour solitary confinement, leaders and legal experts partnered to petition for his freedom. With 450,000 signed petitions collected from sympathizers, the team of allies braved the cold to deliver them to ICE Field Director Sean Gallagher. Refusing to allow the petitions to be placed inside, organizers and involved protesters stood beyond the gates chanting for justice in the pouring rain. Their hard work bore fruit for 21 Savage, but their fight is just beginning. Determined to take things further and abolish ICE, community organizers want equal justice for those without celebrity status.

He Will Not Forget

Lawyers representing 21 Savage released a statement following the announcement that the rapper had won his freedom. Stating that the artist wanted to send a “special message to his fans and supporters”, Charles H. Kuck, Dina LaPolt, and Alex Spiro expressed the following:

“While he wasn’t present at the Grammy Awards, he was there in spirit and is grateful for the support from around the world and is more than ever, ready to be with his loved ones and continue making music that brings people together.

He will not forget this ordeal or any of the other fathers, sons, family members, and faceless people, he was locked up with or that remain unjustly incarcerated across the country. And he asks for your hearts and minds to be with them.”

This is our fight

It is incredibly important that while celebrating 21 Savage’s release we continue to credit the individuals who do this work consistently and remember the faceless who are still in detention. Georgia is among the top five states that detains the most immigrants. Sharing the unfortunate statistic with Texas, California, Arizona, and Louisiana, Georgia holds 3,717 immigrant detainees.

While the U.S. government does not maintain reliable immigrant detainee demographic information, data collected by Freedom For Immigrants shows most victims of this system are between the ages of 26 and 35. The average length of detention could be as little as six months or extend past four years. Locked in private prisons or city/county jails, nutrition issues, medical neglect, solitary confinement, and sexual abuse are among the list of documented abuses that immigrants endure. With the largest immigration detention system in the world, ICE contributes to this profit-driven system.

It is my personal hope that the eye-opening experience of 21 Savage has made the abolition of ICE a necessity for Black Americans who had previously sidelined the ordeal.

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Catch Up! We Are Celebrating Women, Not Hating Them

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It is past time for female artists to have the same, or better recognition from awards organizations. But their acclaim should not come at the expense of another person’s pride.

In a previous article, I discussed the lack of solidarity in rap regarding the continuing fight for women who have yet to receive their seat at the table. Despite being equally, or better talented than their male counterparts, women who rap are consistently pitted against one another in a show of misogyny. Feeding into this beast, BET recently tweeted and deleted a post that they believed was shady enough to be well received. Instead, it serves as a stark reminder that for women, there is still a long way to go.

Learn from this.

It’s hard to believe that just six days ago, that inspirational clip of LaLa Milan went viral. Speaking at a panel for Power Star Live, the emerging comedienne said the following:

“Unfortunately, in our culture we automatically put each other against each other when we’re in the same industry. It’s horrible. You see it every day on social media — ‘Who wore it best?’ ‘Oh, she’s funnier.’ All that stuff like that, but, it’s like…What people don’t realize is when we can all come together as a collective, you automatically have magic.”

Well said! So, how did we go from understanding there is room for everyone to eat, back to the pits of starvation? In a word, misogyny.

Last night, Cardi B celebrated a career milestone only eight other women of rap share. She won a Grammy. Taking home the award for Best Rap Album, Cardi has cemented her place among the genre’s elites by becoming the first woman to win the award solo. Instead of merely congratulating Cardi on her monumental achievement, BET saw it as an opportunity to belittle Nicki Minaj, who has yet to receive the honor. As a network that hosts their own awards show for Hip Hop, you would think BET could do better than perpetuate a negative standard that plagues 37% of rap lyrics and effects every female artist in the game.

When it comes to what is considered an acceptable standard for women performers in any genre of music, one must admit the bar is set unrealistically high. The level of imagination and creativity that is expected from a female artist is beyond what is expected of men. Indeed, after seeing Travis Scott’s Super Bowl “performance”, you could say male artists are allowed a certain celebration of mediocrity. Still, they are more heavily awarded and more easily accepted in the genre that now stands on a foundation of misogyny/misogynoir.

Let It Go.

The longstanding tradition of pitting female artists against one another for drama or ‘catfights’ is dated and should have been put to rest long ago. Women who have made it to that tier of status within the entertainment industry have made it clear that they are queens in their own right. Their successess and shortcomings need not be weighed against one another unless it is for comparison within their own career. And to attach Nicki Minaj to Cardi’s win as an insult was unnecessarily tacky.

In the words of LaLa Milan, “If you’re as hungry as me and you stop trying to starve those around you, we can all eat.” There is room for everyone.

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