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14 Plead Guilty in College Admissions Scandal

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Actress Felicity Huffman, along with twelve other participating parents and one coach, has plead guilty to using fraud and bribery in the multi-million dollar college admissions scandal that shook the country. The affluent group entered their plea Monday in a Boston federal court.

Despite public appeals for prison time, it appears the justice system is going to take it easy on former Desperate Housewives star Felicity Huffman. The actress is facing nearly 20 years for her part in the admissions scandal where she paid $15,000 for SAT testing conditions that facilitated cheating. Yet her guilty plea may have earned her brownie points with federal prosecutors.

According to CNN, Felicity will not face further charges and the prosecution is recommending incarceration at the “low end” of the sentencing range along with other palatable conditions. While there is no clear cut amount of time mention, speculators say Felicity could face as little as 12 to 18 months behind bars, 12 months of supervised release, and a $20,000 fine. Lori Loughlin, on the other hand, is facing a two-year minimum should she take the plea.

While her name was not among the list of other perpetrators to plead guilty, Lori “Aunt Becky” Loughlin and her spouse Mossimo Giannulli have been offered an ultimatum — take the deal or do the time. According to TMZ, the plea deal offered to Loughlin and Giannulli has a higher sentence minimum due to the severity of their crime. Having paid $500,000 for an athletic bribe to a crew coach at USC, the couple is receiving harsher punishment compared to those who just cheated on the Scholastic Aptitude Test. While there’s no indication that Lori or her spouse have taken the deal, time is running out. The duo have a limited time before they face further charges which could raise their prison time.

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BET Awards 2020 | REVIEW

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Beyoncé Drops New Song “Black Parade” [LISTEN]

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Sky News

Beyoncé celebrates Juneteenth with her new song “Black Parade“. Take a listen.

Also, listen to the extended version exclusively on Tidal.

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Noname Drops “Song 33” in Response to J. Cole Diss

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Chicago musician Noname has responded to J. Cole in her latest release “Song 33.” If you recall, two days ago we broke down the Noname/J.Cole beef and why many were calling Cole’s controversial song “Snow on Tha Bluff” misogynist and patriarchal. Noname appears to address the diss track and more on her latest release “Song 33.”

As soon as you press play the track hits you right in the feels. A sample saying “Oh, I have ambitions, dreams / But dreams don’t come cheap” opens the song, then immediately we listen to Noname discuss the patriarchal society in which Black women are forced to exist – a society that undervalues and ignores Black women. She said Oluwatoyin Salu’s name.

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I saw a demon on my shoulder / it’s looking like patriarchy

Like scrubbing blood off the ceiling and bleaching another carpet

She takes aim at J. Cole for staying silent while Black women routinely “go missing,” yet immediately having something to say when she called him out on it. 

One girl missing another one go missing / One girl missing another

But niggas in the back quiet as a church mouse / Basement studio when duty calls to get the verse out

Noname lists all the brutalities happening to Black people and Black women while at the same time, calling him to action. She reminds us Black women are going missing. 

I guess the ego hurt now / It’s time to go to work / Wow

Look at him go / He really ‘bout to write about me when the world is in smokes?

When it’s people in trees?

She then criticizes the internet at large for being too easily distracted by the “beef” and losing sight of “the new world order.” 

It’s trans women being murdered and this is all he can offer?

And this is all y’all receive? / Distracting you from the convo wit organizers

They talkin abolishing the police

This the new world order

Noname has always been an outspoken champion for Black women’s rights, often bringing attention to crimes committed against Black women that regularly go unheard. In her response to J. Cole, the musician again uses her platform to not only highlight the inherent patriarchy that causes so many Black female victims of violent crime to go unnoticed and forgotten, but to also galvanize Cole, to publicly and boldly challenge him and everyone listening to be the vanguards of a more just and equitable society. 

Noname’s call to action is one that has been repeated by women of color for years. Tarana Burke (below), a woman of color and the founder of the “Me Too” Movement, initially began saying the phrase to remind women of color that they are not alone when they struggle with coping with sexual harassment and sexual assault. 

Kimberlé Crenshaw (below), another woman of color and an outspoken feminist and civil rights activist, coined the term “intersectionality” to explain the myriad obstacles Black women face in society and how those obstacles compound on one another to create a unique brand of discrimination against them.

As we take each and every day, but especially this Juneteenth, to reflect on the painful history of the United States and remember the priceless cost of freedom, we must heed Noname’s call and begin to acknowledge the ways we Black Americans are not free, the ways Black women are not free. 

And we must do it in a QUEEN TONE!!!

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