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Why Millennials Are Not Here For Religion

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“Religion is the belief in and worship of a superhuman controlling power.” -dictionary.com

I didn’t grow up in a religious household..meaning we didn’t go to church, we rarely celebrated holidays, and honestly I don’t recall us EVER praying together. You see, my parents (my mom especially) were practical. They instilled in us to think for ourselves and to ask questions, this also included religion. When it came to religion they gave us the option to choose. My mother’s exact words were, “Do your own research, visit some churches, and go with whatever fulfills you.” Funny thing about that is I never really found a church or religion that fulfilled me. I’ve found being spiritual and believing in a higher power was enough for me. There was a time when I thought my beliefs somehow made me a bad person, so when the topic of religion came up I’d bottle up my honest opinions and agree with the majority to avoid the side eyes. Ironically, when I started expressing how I TRULY felt the majority agreed.

Why are millennials shying away from religion? According to the Pew Research Center, millennials are the least outwardly religious American generation, and 1 in 4 are unaffiliated with any religion. 2/3 of millennials believe in God or a universal spirit. The question still remains, WHY?

1. Lack of Trust: Millennials have a hard time trusting anything or anyone because we’ve been let down so many times. We’re constantly hearing stories of corruption and greed going on in the church which makes it hard to fully commit to one. About 5 years ago, my mom finally started going to church consistently for about a year but abruptly stopped. She said she felt it was all about money…every 5 minutes the Pastor was asking the congregation to give money for a church that still to this day hasn’t been built.

2. Not Necessary: Back in the day, church goers were always seen as better or above everyone else but we’ve come to realize that’s not exactly true. Today’s millennials believe you don’t necessarily have to be religious or attend church every week to be a moral person with moral values. With or without it, we know right from wrong. Many people don’t feel you necessarily have to go to church to show your love for God, you can simply pray and worship in the comfort of your own home.

3. Too Judgmental: 60% of Americans from the ages of 18 to 29 admit they don’t go to church because they’re constantly being judged. As millennials we are really big on being ourselves and not being placed in a box. If you’re gay, transgender, transracial, a stripper, single mother, whatever the case..JUST BE YOU. Churches, though some are coming around to it, look down upon these kind of people…especially same sex relationships.

4. Confused: As I said before, we were taught to think for ourselves and ask questions if we don’t understand something. Truthfully, a lot of millennials simply don’t understand religion, and when we ask questions to try to understand it…we end up offending everyone. How can we wholeheartedly support something we don’t understand? A lot of us didn’t grow up in a church. I remember going to Catholic School and having to take a Religion class where I’d constantly get in trouble for asking questions, though I truly didn’t understand it.

 

Please understand this isn’t a religious bashing article. Religion, no religion, black, white, purple, elves…do WHATEVER fulfills you! *mom’s voice*

Twitter: so_dreaaa_ | Instagram: so_dreaaa_ | Snapchat: bundleofdre

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In The Middle: Of A ‘Black Parade’

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12 Year-Old Keedron Bryant Signed to Warner Records

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“OOHHH THANK YA” is all Keedron Bryant had to say on social media when news finally came out that he had signed a record deal with Warner Records.

Amidst all the difficult news we’ve been facing these past few weeks, we wanted to give you something to smile about. You might remember Keedron Bryant, the 12-year-old boy who went viral after posting a video of himself singing “I Just Wanna Live,” a song written by his mother that tells of being Black in America and just wanting to live.

Keedron’s performance was noticed by everyone from former president Barack Obama, who referred to him and posted the performance in a statement on the murder of George Floyd, to comedian Ellen Degeneres, who closed her show with his full video. 

Just when we thought this story couldn’t give us any more feels, it was announced that Keedron was officially signed to Warner Records and his viral hit would be released on all platforms Friday, June 19, otherwise known as Juneteenth, a day marking the end of slavery in America. 

Congratulations are definitely in order for Keedron Bryant.

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Netflix CEO Donates $120 Million to HBCU’s

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Netflix CEO, Reed Hastings, along with his wife, Patty Quillin, are donating $120 million dollars in total to Morehouse College, Spelman College, and the United Negro College Fund. The $120 million will go towards scholarships for the students. Each college will get $40 million.

According to the United Negro College Fund, this is the largest single donation by individuals.

In a statement Hastings and Quillin said, “We’ve supported these three extraordinary institutions for the last few years because we believe that investing in the education of black youth is one of the best ways to invest in America’s future.”

This isn’t Hastings’ and Quillin’s first time donating to HBCU’s and minority education. In 1997, the two began supporting the KIPP charter school network which helps black and latino students. In 2016, Hastings created a $100 million dollar education fund for black and latino scholarships.

“HBCUs have a tremendous record, yet are disadvantaged when it comes to giving. Generally, white capital flows to predominantly white institutions, perpetuating capital isolation. We hope this additional $120 million donation will help more black students follow their dreams and also encourage more people to support these institutions — helping to reverse generations of inequity in our country,” says Hastings and Quillin.

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