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Do Instagram Models Have a Place in Hip-Hop?

From left to right: Dreamdoll, India Love, Danielle Bregoli
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India love just dropped a video for her single “Loco” and it was not met with good reviews. She was a trending topic for the better half of the day and there wasn’t a positive tweet in sight.

 

 

 

With the rise of Instagram models becoming rappers is this the direction rap is going? Rap is being seen as another hustle to get put on instead of something that’s respected and held to a high standard. I’m all for anyone who wants to be a rapper and follow their dreams, but it doesn’t seem authentic. We have people coming in with Dr. Seuss rhymes and claiming to be budding rappers now.

Dreamdoll is another example of this trend. The former bad girl is now a rapper and cast member on VH1’s Love & Hip Hop. Her latest single “We All Love Dream” currently has 8k likes and 12k dislikes on Youtube. Most of the comments under the video are saying the song is trash and making fun of the way she says “horny.” When watching Dreamdoll on Love & Hip Hop she seems more concerned with fighting and fake relationships than her music. We never hear her talk about her music unless she’s throwing her success in her label mate, Mariahlynn’s face. Whereas, with Cardi B she mostly talked about her music and how she wants people to take her seriously.

Cardi B is the most successful Instagram personality-turned-rapper out today. She continues to have hits on the Top Ten Billboard charts. Cardi B is successful because she’s all about her music. On Love & Hip Hop we’ve seen her talk about her struggles breaking into the industry. We’ve seen the progress on her Instagram. Her first two mixtapes were very enjoyable and we were happy to see her win because she deserved it. Cardi proved that she has a passion for music and she will do whatever it takes to make it. You don’t have to be the best rapper alive just act like you give a damn about the art.

Instagram is a great platform to promote yourself and your music. You are able to give visuals to your sound and your fanbase can get a sense of who you are. The artist can control their brand and vision all from their phone. Soundcloud is known as the major underground music source but Instagram could be slowly taking it’s placed, at least for women. Let’s face it. Sex sells. For women, unfortunately, looks are a huge part of your success. Creating a core fanbase on Instagram strictly based on how you look and then slowly converting that into showing off your ventures in music is brilliant. Unfortunately, most of the music we hear from these models aren’t that good.

Today it seems like all you have to do is be pretty and suddenly you have a record deal. If you’re a guy, just have colorful dreads and rap about Xanax and lean and you’ll get a bunch of listens on Soundcloud. Now I’m not one of those rap fans where you have to know every rapper from the 90s and rap as good as Biggie and 2pac, but at least have some talent. India Love & Dreamdoll are both very beautiful women, but rapping is not their strong suit. If it’s just for fun then cool, but to make a career off of it is not preferred.

There are many talented women that can be put on instead. With upcoming rappers like Megan Thee Stallion, Saweetie, Renni Rucci, etc. there’s a plethora of skilled MCs that should pop right now. These women have the whole package yet aren’t getting the same attention as India Love and Dreamdoll. Hell, even the Cash Me Outside girl is a rapper now and honestly isn’t even that bad. With all of these women coming up, I feel like rap music is going to be in good hands. We just have to weed out the insufferable.

 

Thoughts?

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BET Awards 2020 | REVIEW

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Beyoncé Drops New Song “Black Parade” [LISTEN]

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Beyoncé celebrates Juneteenth with her new song “Black Parade“. Take a listen.

Also, listen to the extended version exclusively on Tidal.

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Noname Drops “Song 33” in Response to J. Cole Diss

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Chicago musician Noname has responded to J. Cole in her latest release “Song 33.” If you recall, two days ago we broke down the Noname/J.Cole beef and why many were calling Cole’s controversial song “Snow on Tha Bluff” misogynist and patriarchal. Noname appears to address the diss track and more on her latest release “Song 33.”

As soon as you press play the track hits you right in the feels. A sample saying “Oh, I have ambitions, dreams / But dreams don’t come cheap” opens the song, then immediately we listen to Noname discuss the patriarchal society in which Black women are forced to exist – a society that undervalues and ignores Black women. She said Oluwatoyin Salu’s name.

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I saw a demon on my shoulder / it’s looking like patriarchy

Like scrubbing blood off the ceiling and bleaching another carpet

She takes aim at J. Cole for staying silent while Black women routinely “go missing,” yet immediately having something to say when she called him out on it. 

One girl missing another one go missing / One girl missing another

But niggas in the back quiet as a church mouse / Basement studio when duty calls to get the verse out

Noname lists all the brutalities happening to Black people and Black women while at the same time, calling him to action. She reminds us Black women are going missing. 

I guess the ego hurt now / It’s time to go to work / Wow

Look at him go / He really ‘bout to write about me when the world is in smokes?

When it’s people in trees?

She then criticizes the internet at large for being too easily distracted by the “beef” and losing sight of “the new world order.” 

It’s trans women being murdered and this is all he can offer?

And this is all y’all receive? / Distracting you from the convo wit organizers

They talkin abolishing the police

This the new world order

Noname has always been an outspoken champion for Black women’s rights, often bringing attention to crimes committed against Black women that regularly go unheard. In her response to J. Cole, the musician again uses her platform to not only highlight the inherent patriarchy that causes so many Black female victims of violent crime to go unnoticed and forgotten, but to also galvanize Cole, to publicly and boldly challenge him and everyone listening to be the vanguards of a more just and equitable society. 

Noname’s call to action is one that has been repeated by women of color for years. Tarana Burke (below), a woman of color and the founder of the “Me Too” Movement, initially began saying the phrase to remind women of color that they are not alone when they struggle with coping with sexual harassment and sexual assault. 

Kimberlé Crenshaw (below), another woman of color and an outspoken feminist and civil rights activist, coined the term “intersectionality” to explain the myriad obstacles Black women face in society and how those obstacles compound on one another to create a unique brand of discrimination against them.

As we take each and every day, but especially this Juneteenth, to reflect on the painful history of the United States and remember the priceless cost of freedom, we must heed Noname’s call and begin to acknowledge the ways we Black Americans are not free, the ways Black women are not free. 

And we must do it in a QUEEN TONE!!!

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