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The “Bitches” Are Back

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This past Saturday marked the 2nd Annual Women’s March, a protest to advocate for Women’s Rights. Last year, this groundbreaking protest brought out millions of women nationwide and this year proved to be no different.

In the days leading up to this, I started to talk to a few friends about the march and the article I was about to write. I was taken back by some of the comments I received, “Girl, why? I mean, these white women are marching for other white women”, “This march has nothing to do with me, I’m the highest paid in my department”, “I’m not an oppressed woman…I’m fine”.


It wasn’t as if I didn’t understand their overall sentiment. As a black woman, I have always felt left out of the feminist conversation. I support women’s rights, I support Planned Parenthood being available for the many women that can’t get adequate care anywhere else, I support the idea that every woman should feel safe in their working environment free from being harassed or targeted, I feel that I should be paid the same as my male counterparts for doing the same work.

However, as a black woman I know the frustration of seeing all this energy being devoted to this huge nationwide march when there was no widespread outcry when Philando Castile’s murderer was set free, I know the uncomfortable feeling of being the only black woman in your entire department and if you’re not walking around smiling all the time or if you disagree with someone you’re immediately labeled angry or as having a “chip on your shoulder”. Meanwhile, your white counterparts can have full tantrums or shouting matches and be labeled “passionate”.

There is a struggle for black women in America that many refuse to talk about or acknowledge and it’s a struggle very independent from black men and non-black women. Nevertheless, I attended the march with mixed feelings. When I arrived, I was pleasantly surprised to see that there were women and men of all different ages and races with many sharing my same hue.

There were young girls walking with their grandmothers, men walking with their wives, daughters, and sons. The signs and chants called for equality, rights, and protection for all women. This year’s theme centered around voting and letting the female vote be heard in local elections. For example, many of you might remember Judge Aaron Persky.

In June 2016, Judge Persky sentenced Brock Turner, the 20-year-old Stanford student convicted of felony sexual assault, to only six months in jail for which he served three months. Turner could have received a maximum fourteen years in prison. When asked about his decision in the Turner case, Persky stated that he found a prison sentence would have a “severe impact” on Turner, and his life would suffer severe “collateral consequences”.

Shortly after, Judge Persky was re-elected without opposition in Santa Clara County, located in Northern California. Persky, and the countless others like him, should not sit in any position of power which is why the Women’s March aimed to get all women, especially under-represented groups such as Latinas and African Americans, educated and passionate about getting out to vote with every election.


As I stood in the crowd listening to these women speak out against racism, sexism and sexual abuse I couldn’t help but be moved. I thought about my own daughter and what this could all mean for her future. It’s time to have this conversation openly across all color and economic lines. Male or female the rights of women are something that affects everyone, same as right for people of color. At the end of the day, this is about Human Rights and Human Rights are Women’s Rights, together we rise. For more information about the Women’s March 2018 or how you have to get involved please click here.

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For The Culture

LeBron James Opened an $8 Million School?!

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TIME

LeBron James just opened an $8 million public school called I Promise, where kids will have access to free bikes, free meals, free uniforms, free transportation within 2 miles, and much more! The school is for at-risk students in Akron, Ohio who are usually overlooked.

Twitter loved this news. A few even called for LeBron to replace Betsy Devos, the current Secretary of Education.

While many celebrated the opening of this school, many also rightfully noted that no one person should have access to that much money or be in control of the lives of that many students. This led to many discussing socialism and what this type of school could look like if not funded by a private citizen.

 

What are your thoughts on the school? This is overall a great thing, but do you think celebrities, or any rich person, should be able to hoard enough money to do this on their own?

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For The Culture

Huffington Post’s ‘Black Voices’ Gets Called Out For Having White Writers

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Lara Witt-Twitter

Lara Witt—editor of the feminist publication, Wear Your Voice Magazine—pointed out on Twitter that majority of the writers for the Huffington Post’s Black Voices editorial are…white.

The editor for Black Voices, Taryn Finley, is a Black woman, a Delta, and a Howard University graduate. How is it that the company felt comfortable enough hiring what seems like a token Black person to run the site, but did not feel the need to pay other Black writers to be a contributor? Black Voices claims to be sharing “our news” and “our voices,” but this cannot be true when it is non-Black people who are writing the stories. No matter how much Taryn edits for them, the stories are still not ours.

We have seen time and time again how white people will slap the word “Black” on a source of entertainment and feel justified in keeping their voices centered in that space. We’ve seen it with Viacom through BET and now we see it through Black Voices, which is owned and, apparently, operated by white people. If Huffington Post wants to fix this, they need to hire Black writers. There is nothing else to it.

 

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A Black President Before A Black Photographer: Vogue, This Ain’t It

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126 years and Vogue has never had a black cover photographer… The United States of America and all of its racism elected a Black president before Vogue allowed a Black photographer to shoot for their cover.

I’m not sure if this is even something we should celebrate. Congratulations to Beyoncé for getting on the cover of the September issue of US Vogue and reportedly having “unprecedented access” to create whatever she wants apparently. But had it not been for this, when would Vogue have decided it was time for a Black photographer?

The United States of America and all of its racism elected a black president before Vogue allowed a black photographer for their cover. Click To Tweet

Come to find out this may be Anna Wintour’s last cover as CEO, according to Huffington Post. Beyoncé has hired Tyler Mitchell, a 23-year-old from Atlanta, GA. He will be the first Black photographer to shoot a cover in Vogue’s 126-year history. The photographer and filmmaker has worked with several known brands from Mercedes Benz to Marc Jacobs and Givenchy. This is an amazing opportunity for Mitchell and I’m confident that he will shake the f*ck out of the table in September.

To learn that he will be the first is a proud and sad moment for me. When first hearing the news and the details, I was ecstatic and wanted to know what Bey would be cooking up for the girls this fall, but then I sat in my bed and read some of the titles again and “first Black” and “126 years” kept coming up. I sent a quick text to Taryn Myers—an editor and writer for KingofReads.com—and told her how I felt. It didn’t come to her at first, but the wheels started to turn and she shared something important: “Vogue has been one of the primary messengers about what beauty, wealth, fashion and culture is right?” So to know that they’ve been pushing what is beauty for many years, even in this supposedly “progressive” state we’re in now, and we’re just now getting a Black photographer cover in 2018 speaks volumes.

“The First Black” I expect when we’re talking about government, since America has been ran and founded by white men. I shouldn’t be surprised since most of the publications are ran by those who are for Black and Brown people when capitalism calls them to it. These companies don’t truly care about us because and I don’t think they all of the sudden got it or it hit them. The beautiful Beverly Ann Johnson was the first Black woman to appear on the cover of Vogue in 1974 and even she probably wasn’t allowed to hire a Black photographer.

Nonetheless, Beyoncé and Tyler will create some Black magic for the September cover and Vogue will think that they have done something “progressive” to help them sleep in their white sheets at night not realizing that given tardiness is about as damaging as white sheets with two holes in it.

 

 

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