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Beyonce’s Reclamation: The Blackness that Helped form Country Music Should Not Be Erased

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Beyoncé had a lot of these cousin-marrying racists so angry with the performance of her heavily country-influenced song called Daddy Lessons. Honestly, die-hard country fans (I’m still shocked to know that’s even a thing) were angry that she decided to create Daddy Lessons in the first place.

They were saying “stay in your own genre, Beyoncé.” This is really ironic because according the the Chicago Tribune country music was born out of the combination of ‘the ballads and folksongs brought to the South by immigrants from the British Isles in the 18th and 19th Centuries and the rhythmic influences of African immigrants” So what are you idiots talking about, when you tell us to stay out of your genre? You mean the one we helped create? Im not about to let you steal yet another piece of culture (like Elvis did his whole career) and not credit, accept the people who helped create it.

Now, if we use this same “stay in your own genre” logic in rap music, no white person would be creating hip-hop. It was because of the oppression that whites put on blacks that Hip-Hop was born. Yet, even through that we have no problem with whites using their voice in Hip-Hop as long as they fully understand the movement and are culturally sensitive.

Even the very instruments that you use to play your nasally-ass anthems has our name on it. The Tribune also informs us that “The banjo, which mimics the banjar played in Africa, was invented by Southern blacks in the late 1690s. Slaves also played the fiddle, which was introduced to them by their white masters.” So what’s the goddamn tea? Don’t claim Beyonce is supposed to stay out of a genre that her ancestors helped create. Just because whites were at a socioeconomic level to create rules for intellectual property and profit off of those ideas, doesn’t mean that blacks don’t have a right to their own shit.

Now, if we use this same “stay in your own genre” logic in rap music, no white person would be creating hip-hop. It was because of the oppression that whites put on blacks that Hip-Hop was born. Yet, even through that we have no problem with whites using their voice in Hip-Hop as long as they fully understand the movement and are culturally sensitive.

The fact that Beyoncé invited the Dixie Chicks to perform with her, is also another slap in the face that conservative whiteys couldn’t handle. They already shaded the Dixie Chicks for their democratic views and their critiques of Donald Trump, so for her “cop-hating” ass to perform a song they didn’t like with a group they’re not fond of was complete shade and I live for it.

Tomi Lahren’s idiotic, blimp shape head ass went to twitter to imply that Beyoncé hates cops. I never understood why it’s so hard for these dog-kissing, primitive ass confederate flag flyers to realize that the true essence of the Black Lives Matter movement is to combat police brutality. Just because I don’t agree with the senseless slaughter of my people by cops, doesn’t mean that I don’t appreciate those cops who truly protect and serve. It’s really not a difficult concept.

But as usual, a lot of egotistical, racist white people don’t like it when all the attention is not on them. So if it’s a social justice movement, or a genre of music they’ll only want the whiteness of it highlighted. This, of course, promotes the age-old trend of blackness being erased or appropriated for profit.

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In The Middle: Of A ‘Black Parade’

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12 Year-Old Keedron Bryant Signed to Warner Records

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“OOHHH THANK YA” is all Keedron Bryant had to say on social media when news finally came out that he had signed a record deal with Warner Records.

Amidst all the difficult news we’ve been facing these past few weeks, we wanted to give you something to smile about. You might remember Keedron Bryant, the 12-year-old boy who went viral after posting a video of himself singing “I Just Wanna Live,” a song written by his mother that tells of being Black in America and just wanting to live.

Keedron’s performance was noticed by everyone from former president Barack Obama, who referred to him and posted the performance in a statement on the murder of George Floyd, to comedian Ellen Degeneres, who closed her show with his full video. 

Just when we thought this story couldn’t give us any more feels, it was announced that Keedron was officially signed to Warner Records and his viral hit would be released on all platforms Friday, June 19, otherwise known as Juneteenth, a day marking the end of slavery in America. 

Congratulations are definitely in order for Keedron Bryant.

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Netflix CEO Donates $120 Million to HBCU’s

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Netflix CEO, Reed Hastings, along with his wife, Patty Quillin, are donating $120 million dollars in total to Morehouse College, Spelman College, and the United Negro College Fund. The $120 million will go towards scholarships for the students. Each college will get $40 million.

According to the United Negro College Fund, this is the largest single donation by individuals.

In a statement Hastings and Quillin said, “We’ve supported these three extraordinary institutions for the last few years because we believe that investing in the education of black youth is one of the best ways to invest in America’s future.”

This isn’t Hastings’ and Quillin’s first time donating to HBCU’s and minority education. In 1997, the two began supporting the KIPP charter school network which helps black and latino students. In 2016, Hastings created a $100 million dollar education fund for black and latino scholarships.

“HBCUs have a tremendous record, yet are disadvantaged when it comes to giving. Generally, white capital flows to predominantly white institutions, perpetuating capital isolation. We hope this additional $120 million donation will help more black students follow their dreams and also encourage more people to support these institutions — helping to reverse generations of inequity in our country,” says Hastings and Quillin.

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