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T.I. and Tiny to Appear on Red Table Talk

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According to an ET exclusive, Jada Pinkett Smith has made space for T.I. to address his recent controversy regarding the invasive lengths of his parenting. But does T.I. truly need another platform to spew his willful ignorance?

After catching heat for comments made during a now-removed episode of Ladies Like Us, T.I. is on a redemption tour. Hoping to regain some favor with the public, he is appearing on Red Table Talk alone and alongside his wife, Tiny. Set to air next week, many are expecting the episode to feature an explanation for his poor judgment but more are wondering if it is truly necessary. With the damage already done and fallout ensuing, what more can T.I. add to the conversation that will not further exploit his daughter? And why was Deyjah not extended an invitation to express herself instead?

As someone who grew up in an oppressively protective household, I identify with Deyjah’s struggle. It is difficult to grow up in a space where you do not have agency over your own body or the license to explore your sexuality. Coming of age within the strict confines of what can only be described as the training grounds for a ‘Proverbs 31 woman’ is something few aspire to endure, Deyjah Harris included. After being embarrassed by T.I. and unsupported by Tiny, Deyjah has taken steps to separate herself from her family or, at the very least, protect her peace. Deyjah’s unfollowing of the immediate members of The Harris fold on social media and liking the posts of understanding strangers has stood out as her signs of rebellion. Still, she has yet to publicly articulate the extent of her trauma which is her right. However, it is my personal opinion that until she is given and accepts the opportunity to publicly condone the wrongs against her, all other persons, namely T.I., should kindly shut up.

While there is no way to confirm whether Jada offered Deyjah an opportunity to begin or continue her healing at the Red Table, to extend an invitation to her abuser is tacky. T.I. has proven time and again that he is a hardened misogynist. He views his wife, her body, and her sexuality as possessions to be exploited and has groomed his daughter for the same abusive treatment through unwarranted gynecological visits. Even during his Red Table Talk episode T.I. will exploit his wife’s pain by rehashing “how they survived, in regards to their marriage.” The man simply does not need another soap box, pulpit, microphone, or stage to amplify his narrow-minded musings. Regardless of the satisfaction we might find in an educational public dogpiling, it should not come by the complicity of another woman or at a woman’s expense.

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BET Awards 2020 | REVIEW

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Beyoncé Drops New Song “Black Parade” [LISTEN]

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Sky News

Beyoncé celebrates Juneteenth with her new song “Black Parade“. Take a listen.

Also, listen to the extended version exclusively on Tidal.

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Noname Drops “Song 33” in Response to J. Cole Diss

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Chicago musician Noname has responded to J. Cole in her latest release “Song 33.” If you recall, two days ago we broke down the Noname/J.Cole beef and why many were calling Cole’s controversial song “Snow on Tha Bluff” misogynist and patriarchal. Noname appears to address the diss track and more on her latest release “Song 33.”

As soon as you press play the track hits you right in the feels. A sample saying “Oh, I have ambitions, dreams / But dreams don’t come cheap” opens the song, then immediately we listen to Noname discuss the patriarchal society in which Black women are forced to exist – a society that undervalues and ignores Black women. She said Oluwatoyin Salu’s name.

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I saw a demon on my shoulder / it’s looking like patriarchy

Like scrubbing blood off the ceiling and bleaching another carpet

She takes aim at J. Cole for staying silent while Black women routinely “go missing,” yet immediately having something to say when she called him out on it. 

One girl missing another one go missing / One girl missing another

But niggas in the back quiet as a church mouse / Basement studio when duty calls to get the verse out

Noname lists all the brutalities happening to Black people and Black women while at the same time, calling him to action. She reminds us Black women are going missing. 

I guess the ego hurt now / It’s time to go to work / Wow

Look at him go / He really ‘bout to write about me when the world is in smokes?

When it’s people in trees?

She then criticizes the internet at large for being too easily distracted by the “beef” and losing sight of “the new world order.” 

It’s trans women being murdered and this is all he can offer?

And this is all y’all receive? / Distracting you from the convo wit organizers

They talkin abolishing the police

This the new world order

Noname has always been an outspoken champion for Black women’s rights, often bringing attention to crimes committed against Black women that regularly go unheard. In her response to J. Cole, the musician again uses her platform to not only highlight the inherent patriarchy that causes so many Black female victims of violent crime to go unnoticed and forgotten, but to also galvanize Cole, to publicly and boldly challenge him and everyone listening to be the vanguards of a more just and equitable society. 

Noname’s call to action is one that has been repeated by women of color for years. Tarana Burke (below), a woman of color and the founder of the “Me Too” Movement, initially began saying the phrase to remind women of color that they are not alone when they struggle with coping with sexual harassment and sexual assault. 

Kimberlé Crenshaw (below), another woman of color and an outspoken feminist and civil rights activist, coined the term “intersectionality” to explain the myriad obstacles Black women face in society and how those obstacles compound on one another to create a unique brand of discrimination against them.

As we take each and every day, but especially this Juneteenth, to reflect on the painful history of the United States and remember the priceless cost of freedom, we must heed Noname’s call and begin to acknowledge the ways we Black Americans are not free, the ways Black women are not free. 

And we must do it in a QUEEN TONE!!!

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