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Mase Demands Diddy Give Artist Back Their Money

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Last week Diddy was honored with the Icon Award at the Clive Davis pre-Grammys and according to Yahoo! Entertainment, called out The Recording Academy for overlooking hip hop artists. 

During his impassioned acceptance speech, Diddy stated, “Black music has never been respected by the Grammys to the point that it should be.” The hip hop mogul continued, “This thing been going on, and it’s not just going on in music, it’s going on in the film, it’s going on in sports, it’s going around the world. And for years we’ve allowed institutions that have never had our best interest at heart to judge us. And that stops right now.” 

Diddy ended his speech by setting a timetable, “I’m officially starting the clock — y’all got 365 days to get this shit together.”

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@diddy I heard your #Grammy speech about how u are now for the artist and about how the artist must take back control. So I will be the first to take that initiative. Also, before we ask of other ethnicities to do us right we should do us as black people better. Especially the creators. I heard u loud and clear when u said that u are now for the artist and to that my response is if u want to see change you can make a change today by starting with yourself. Your past business practices knowingly has continued purposely starved your artist and been extremely unfair to the very same artist that helped u obtain that Icon Award on the iconic Badboy label. For example, u still got my publishing from 24 years ago in which u gave me $20k. Which makes me never want to work w/ u as any artist wouldn’t after u know someone is robbing you & tarnishing your name when u don’t want to comply w/ his horrendous business model. However, people would always ask what’s up w/ Mase? So I would be forced to still perform to not look crazy when I was getting peanuts and the robbery would continue. So many great moments and people lives in music were lost. But again, I rode with u in the face of death without flinching & u still wouldn’t do right. I never said anything because I wanted to wait until I was financially great so I can ensured that I was addressing this from a pure place and not out of spite. To add insult, u keep screaming black excellence and love but I know love isn’t free. So I offered u 2m in cash just a few days ago to sell me back my publishing(as his biggest artist alive) that always show u respect for u giving me an opportunity at 19 yrs old. Your response was if I can match what the EUROPEAN GUY OFFER him that would be the only way I can get it back. Or else I can wait until I’m 50 years old and it will revert back to me from when I was 19 years old. You bought it for about 20k & I offered you 2m in cash. This is not black excellence at all. When our own race is enslaving us. If it’s about us owning, it can’t be about us owning each other. No More Hiding Behind “Love”. U CHANGED? GIVE THE ARTIST BACK THEIR $$$. So they can take care of their families

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Today, Mase did some calling out of his own as the former rapper took to Instagram to address Sean “Diddy” Combs directly. Mase posted, “@diddy I heard your #Grammy speech about how u are now for the artist and about how the artist must take back control. So I will be the first to take that initiative.” 

He went on to say, “I heard u loud and clear when u said that u are now for the artist and to that my response is if u want to see the change you can make a change today by starting with yourself.”

Mase accused Diddy of having past business practices that “purposely starved your artist…the very same artist that helped u obtain that Icon Award on the iconic Badboy label.” Mase closed out his Instagram rant with a demand of his own, “GIVE THE ARTIST BACK THEIR $$$. So they can take care of their families.”

Thus far, Diddy has yet to respond, but we’re hopeful that these two can sit down and hash out their differences. After all, “nobody wins when the family feuds.”

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Beyoncé Drops New Song “Black Parade” [LISTEN]

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Beyoncé celebrates Juneteenth with her new song “Black Parade“. Take a listen.

Also, listen to the extended version exclusively on Tidal.

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Noname Drops “Song 33” in Response to J. Cole Diss

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Chicago musician Noname has responded to J. Cole in her latest release “Song 33.” If you recall, two days ago we broke down the Noname/J.Cole beef and why many were calling Cole’s controversial song “Snow on Tha Bluff” misogynist and patriarchal. Noname appears to address the diss track and more on her latest release “Song 33.”

As soon as you press play the track hits you right in the feels. A sample saying “Oh, I have ambitions, dreams / But dreams don’t come cheap” opens the song, then immediately we listen to Noname discuss the patriarchal society in which Black women are forced to exist – a society that undervalues and ignores Black women. She said Oluwatoyin Salu’s name.

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I saw a demon on my shoulder / it’s looking like patriarchy

Like scrubbing blood off the ceiling and bleaching another carpet

She takes aim at J. Cole for staying silent while Black women routinely “go missing,” yet immediately having something to say when she called him out on it. 

One girl missing another one go missing / One girl missing another

But niggas in the back quiet as a church mouse / Basement studio when duty calls to get the verse out

Noname lists all the brutalities happening to Black people and Black women while at the same time, calling him to action. She reminds us Black women are going missing. 

I guess the ego hurt now / It’s time to go to work / Wow

Look at him go / He really ‘bout to write about me when the world is in smokes?

When it’s people in trees?

She then criticizes the internet at large for being too easily distracted by the “beef” and losing sight of “the new world order.” 

It’s trans women being murdered and this is all he can offer?

And this is all y’all receive? / Distracting you from the convo wit organizers

They talkin abolishing the police

This the new world order

Noname has always been an outspoken champion for Black women’s rights, often bringing attention to crimes committed against Black women that regularly go unheard. In her response to J. Cole, the musician again uses her platform to not only highlight the inherent patriarchy that causes so many Black female victims of violent crime to go unnoticed and forgotten, but to also galvanize Cole, to publicly and boldly challenge him and everyone listening to be the vanguards of a more just and equitable society. 

Noname’s call to action is one that has been repeated by women of color for years. Tarana Burke (below), a woman of color and the founder of the “Me Too” Movement, initially began saying the phrase to remind women of color that they are not alone when they struggle with coping with sexual harassment and sexual assault. 

Kimberlé Crenshaw (below), another woman of color and an outspoken feminist and civil rights activist, coined the term “intersectionality” to explain the myriad obstacles Black women face in society and how those obstacles compound on one another to create a unique brand of discrimination against them.

As we take each and every day, but especially this Juneteenth, to reflect on the painful history of the United States and remember the priceless cost of freedom, we must heed Noname’s call and begin to acknowledge the ways we Black Americans are not free, the ways Black women are not free. 

And we must do it in a QUEEN TONE!!!

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