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Former Smallville Actress Allison Mac Pleads Guilty in Sex Cult Case

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Once hailed as the best sidekick to a young Clark Kent during her stint on Smallville, Allison Mack is known now for twisting her inviting demeanor to lure women into an abusive sex cult named NXIVM. April 8th, the former actress went to federal court in Brooklyn, pleading guilty to racketeering charges. She stands accused of recruiting sex slaves for the sex cult’s spiritual leader, Keith Raniere.

Last year in New York, Allison Mack was arrested for coercing and manipulating young women into a lifestyle of sexual servitude. Acting as the lead recruiter for the men of NXIVM, Mack is facing 15 years to life in prison for conspiracy, conspiracy to commit forced labor, and sex trafficking. Released from custody on $5 million bond, the actress has been expected to comply with investigative efforts and prosecutors building the case against cult leader Keith Raniere. Her involvement with the illicit organization left so many dumbfounded.

From Self-Help to Sadism

How could the seemingly innocent and mousy Mack be capable of convincing women to commit themselves to Master-slave sexual relationships consummated by pelvic brands? Those in the know say it began in 2006 with the popularity of the life-changing novel The Secret.

While living and filming Smallville in Vancouver, Mack became involved with the burgeoning bohemian lifestyle. Invested in the New Age counterculture, which was the center of such sexually liberating movements in the 60s, Mack was fascinated by empowering, self-help tools the book suggested. These tools and principles were used by Raniere’s cult, dispensed through ESP or Executive Success Programs.

Selling a dream of achieving goals and attaining status, overcoming traumas, and commanding confidence, the courses ranged from single to extended sessions. Those who could afford the high price tag would find themselves in the presence of Raniere via short videos fed into curriculum by instructors in conference centers.

The small group sessions focused on gleaning information from attendees, in a fashion similar to Scientology readings. Through this process, a source who attended the courses says it was easy to identify targets for recruitment to DOS, a secret society also known as “The Vow.” Preying on Allison Mack’s desire to assist and uplift others, recruiters manipulated her desire to make a contribution to female empowerment. But her place in the organization came at a price.

The Vow

Those who wanted to join the elite circle were required to perform menial tasks and submit incriminating personal information in the event they ever attempted to leave. Photos, testimonials, any form of collateral was collected and saved for use if former members attempted to discredit the organization. Court documents state that “DOS slaves understood that if they told anyone about DOS, if they left DOS or if they failed to complete assignments given to them by their masters, their collateral could be released.”

Members were subjected to forced celibacy, sleep deprivation, and starvation. They took part in ‘readiness’ drills and suffered humiliation tactics. Later, at Allison Mack’s behest, the group engaged in branding ceremonies to mark the pelvic area of slaves. According to court documents, Mack would place her hands on the slaves’ chests and told them to “feel the pain” and to think of their master.”

Sobbing in court before Judge Nicholas Garaufis, Allison Mack pleaded, “I must take full responsibility for my conduct. I am very sorry for my role in this case. I am very sorry to my family and to the good people I hurt through my misguided adherence to Keith Raniere’s teachings.” She admitted to keeping a slave “to perform services” for her, and concealing the identity of Raniere’s role as head of DOS. While her sentencing is set for September 11th, Mack does not stand alone. In total, six people were apprehended for their part in the cult along with Seagram’s liquor heriess Claire Bronfman, who funded the organization.

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Beyoncé Drops New Song “Black Parade” [LISTEN]

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Beyoncé celebrates Juneteenth with her new song “Black Parade“. Take a listen.

Also, listen to the extended version exclusively on Tidal.

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Noname Drops “Song 33” in Response to J. Cole Diss

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Chicago musician Noname has responded to J. Cole in her latest release “Song 33.” If you recall, two days ago we broke down the Noname/J.Cole beef and why many were calling Cole’s controversial song “Snow on Tha Bluff” misogynist and patriarchal. Noname appears to address the diss track and more on her latest release “Song 33.”

As soon as you press play the track hits you right in the feels. A sample saying “Oh, I have ambitions, dreams / But dreams don’t come cheap” opens the song, then immediately we listen to Noname discuss the patriarchal society in which Black women are forced to exist – a society that undervalues and ignores Black women. She said Oluwatoyin Salu’s name.

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I saw a demon on my shoulder / it’s looking like patriarchy

Like scrubbing blood off the ceiling and bleaching another carpet

She takes aim at J. Cole for staying silent while Black women routinely “go missing,” yet immediately having something to say when she called him out on it. 

One girl missing another one go missing / One girl missing another

But niggas in the back quiet as a church mouse / Basement studio when duty calls to get the verse out

Noname lists all the brutalities happening to Black people and Black women while at the same time, calling him to action. She reminds us Black women are going missing. 

I guess the ego hurt now / It’s time to go to work / Wow

Look at him go / He really ‘bout to write about me when the world is in smokes?

When it’s people in trees?

She then criticizes the internet at large for being too easily distracted by the “beef” and losing sight of “the new world order.” 

It’s trans women being murdered and this is all he can offer?

And this is all y’all receive? / Distracting you from the convo wit organizers

They talkin abolishing the police

This the new world order

Noname has always been an outspoken champion for Black women’s rights, often bringing attention to crimes committed against Black women that regularly go unheard. In her response to J. Cole, the musician again uses her platform to not only highlight the inherent patriarchy that causes so many Black female victims of violent crime to go unnoticed and forgotten, but to also galvanize Cole, to publicly and boldly challenge him and everyone listening to be the vanguards of a more just and equitable society. 

Noname’s call to action is one that has been repeated by women of color for years. Tarana Burke (below), a woman of color and the founder of the “Me Too” Movement, initially began saying the phrase to remind women of color that they are not alone when they struggle with coping with sexual harassment and sexual assault. 

Kimberlé Crenshaw (below), another woman of color and an outspoken feminist and civil rights activist, coined the term “intersectionality” to explain the myriad obstacles Black women face in society and how those obstacles compound on one another to create a unique brand of discrimination against them.

As we take each and every day, but especially this Juneteenth, to reflect on the painful history of the United States and remember the priceless cost of freedom, we must heed Noname’s call and begin to acknowledge the ways we Black Americans are not free, the ways Black women are not free. 

And we must do it in a QUEEN TONE!!!

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